While doing some research, I stumbled upon a 1998 article/site talking about websites as digital gardens. Plenty of great, if somewhat esoteric, advice on making a website experience more of a collection of 'Unexpected Delights' than a rigid system.

This speaks to me - highly recommended!

eastgate.com/garden/

@FredBednarski Interestingly (to me), I really like the website, and the garden metaphor, but my idea of a garden is very different to the author's, so I mostly disagree with all the words.

Formal gardens, and the weird (but a common theme in European culture) aversion to wilderness are both really repulsive to me! It's very colonial.

Also interesting that like every website that promotes itself as inspired by this idea is really... sterile.

@blueberrysoft Yeah, it's definitely not "gospel." There are some things there I disagree with as well. However, it is interesting to see this being considered so long before the web we have nowadays.

Curiously, I know he talks more about gardens as parks, but after reading it I imagine personal gardens, where you plant foodstuffs. Sure, they are organized, but also wild with the bunch of trees in the back, the rhubarb that appeared from nowhere and that spot where you keep your old tools :)

@FredBednarski Yeah! That's the disconnect I have too. Like their page doesn't seem too much like a formal garden to me, that's why I like it.

I started writing a blog post, but:

> To me gardens have weeds, failures, spiders, are never finished, evolve, are improvisational, show time...

@FredBednarski (btw I like what you did to get the image-based drop shadow on your page :knp_merl: )

@blueberrysoft Thanks :)

Hopefully it is clear enough to figure out/reproduce. I just came back to html after a looooong break, so my css-fu is not strong, as most of css is new to me ;)

This reminds me, I should probably add it to my css cheatsheet :P

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Merveilles is a community project aimed at the establishment of new ways of speaking, seeing and organizing information — A culture that seeks augmentation through the arts of engineering and design. A warm welcome to any like-minded people who feel these ideals resonate with them.