Conclusion to my webfont explorations (thus far):

1. I removed custom webfonts for monospace, because consolas on Windows and monaco on Mac looked good enough.

2. fontsquirrel.net has the webfont generator, which in custom options allows you to create webfonts with character subsets. I write mostly English prose, so 'Basic Latin' is probably good enough for now - enough to bring most my fonts to ~20kb.

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I also found cssfontstack.com/ - which looks at web safe system fonts both for Mac and Windows. I used it to set up my fallback font stack.

I will say that it was pretty interesting to dive deep into the rabbit hole of webfonts. I never had to think about how big they were before, so I had no idea the general filesize footprint of a font.

What I've generally found is that Latin fonts fall in the 100s of kbs, while Chinese fonts are usually several megabytes.

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I'm not sure what my strategy will be if I ever decide to add Chinese to my site. But that's something I'll think about when I get there.

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@amorphous I was looking into the same thing recently, and as Chinese is a language I'm learning my website does need to support it. The only solid multilingual option I found is the Noto family, but the download sizes do get yuge. Saving this thread for future reference!

@royniang @amorphous I’m using the Memrise course which is surprisingly good, and also listening to conversations between my wife and her friends/family and try to pick up what they say. As a dictionary, an app called Pleco is fantastic!

@gueorgui @royniang I don’t have too much insight as I’ve been speaking Chinese my whole life, but I’ll second Pleco as a very good dictionary.

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Merveilles is a community project aimed at the establishment of new ways of speaking, seeing and organizing information — A culture that seeks augmentation through the arts of engineering and design. A warm welcome to any like-minded people who feel these ideals resonate with them.