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Cooling homes, increasing ventilation, and reducing energy consumption by changing the temperatures of surfaces, not air. scientificamerican.com/article

@lrhodes Le Corbusier has some cool (heh) designs in India with false roofs and catacomb-like windows, all designed to keep the heat down.

I was a little disappointed to see air conditioners placed in the windows, but maybe they don't have to work as hard?

Radiant cooling seems really neat.

@kai Yeah, alternative cooling systems are neat. (Alt heating, too, but it seems less tricky ever since we discovered that whole fire thing.) My interest in a lot of this was piqued by randomly running across an article about zeer pots ages ago.

@lrhodes I'm always frustrated on a cool evening after a hot summer day, when the house is still hot but outside is perfectly comfortable, and there doesn't seem to be any way to move the air efficiently

@lrhodes Near where I live, there's this Victorian era house that was designed with passive cooling (and is generally quirky & awesome): dustyoldthing.com/korners-foll

The architect incorporated a series of channels running through the house to circulate the cool air from underneath. While of course not as cold as air-conditioning, it kept the house cool in the summer.

Of course this kind of bespoke solution is not available to everyone, but it could be an interesting case study :)

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Merveilles

Merveilles is a community project aimed at the establishment of new ways of speaking, seeing and organizing information — A culture that seeks augmentation through the arts of engineering and design. A warm welcome to any like-minded people who feel these ideals resonate with them.