If anyone is interested, there’s some pretty interesting exchanges that have been going on a while on the bird site between Jonathan Blow & Casey Muratori, and the creator & supporters of the soon to be released Mighty browser, which is basically fancy Chrome but in the cloud, like the Stadia of web browsers.

Jonathan and Casey both speaking their minds freely.

I’m curious to hear what all your opinions are, Fediversians. (I think I can guess).

twitter.com/cmuratori/status/1

twitter.com/jonathan_blow/stat

@neauoire I think I can haha 😆

I’m still interested in hearing their content and nuances though.

Follow

@freedcreative I think this is a very strong sign of technological collapse, but also more generally, this is a pattern that shows that we cannot reduce emissions at all. The only things humans will listen to is thermodynamics.

We should be running away from this full steam, but you can just tell that this will become the new normal.

· · Web · 2 · 6 · 12

@neauoire @freedcreative We prepare and learn the lessons to teach when whoever is left is ready to listen

@neauoire I think, sadly, you’re right.

There’s a lot of motivation for companies to fund this type of setup as a back door into Apple’s walled garden. Apple have been blocking web app growth by deliberately dragging their feet on browser upgrades, but with this it won’t matter. Access app stores from other big corps through any browser, no ability for Apple to force bottlenecks or 30% fees. That will bring the big money, and big money always gets its way.

@neauoire You might have already seen it, but Jonathan Blow also has a talk I really enjoyed where he argues, quite well, that the collapse of deep technology and programming understanding will lead to the collapse of our tech dependent civilization.

I only know web coding myself but all this definitely motivates me to dig deeper and try to be part of the solution, or at least less of the problem.

@freedcreative yeah I'm familiar with it.

One of the worst thing to me about this is that obfuscate how much someone is being wasteful. You can't tell that a supercomputer is loading that website you're accessing, it hides its own flaws, leaves people to consume without understanding the true cost.

@neauoire @freedcreative The browser as a service sounds like the worst possible idea. But for BigTech, if they can pull it off, it would be the perfect way to gather data about how people interact with the web. Comprehensive surveillance of the user. Every keystroke and pointer movement. Biometric fingerprinting via browser use patterns.

Mozilla already does this to some extent via telemetry, but if the browser was in the cloud then far more data could be captured.

@bob @neauoire @freedcreative And it would serve as an incentive for web devs to bloat sites even more, because "all the users have a super computer anyway".

@tinyrabbit @bob @neauoire @freedcreative The challenge of overcoming network latency is formidable, but people already expect browsers to be sluggish so maybe this is not as big an obstacle as it seems.

There has already been a lot of consolidation into the cloud in the last decade, but browser as a service would remove any need for open standards and enable further consolidation. The internet as a single centralised and fully proprietary system is the dream of BigTech.

@freedcreative @neauoire I can't agree with your reasoning.

Apple is relatively insignificant. At < 10% of the desktop market and only around 33% of the mobile market, they are barely a concern. Android owns double the market share and has relatively up-to-date browsers. Meanwhile, Windows continues to dominate the desktop market.

It's ad blockers that are significant.

This technology absolutely guarantees that you cannot run ad blockers. Ad blockers running on any local browser will be neutered. Only "authorized" plugins may be available for your use.

Concerns over rendering full-function websites on underpowered hardware is just a facade for the real motivation.

@vertigo @neauoire That’s very true as well. There are lots of ways big tech could use this approach to boost their bottom line.

Apple is certainly relevant to some large companies though, which is why we’re seeing Epic fighting them in court over their revenue share and locking out of alternative stores, and why Microsoft are creating browser based access to their game streaming services. It sometimes only takes a couple of tech giants to sway the status quo significantly in their favor.

Sign in to participate in the conversation
Merveilles

Merveilles is a community project aimed at the establishment of new ways of speaking, seeing and organizing information — A culture that seeks augmentation through the arts of engineering and design. A warm welcome to any like-minded people who feel these ideals resonate with them.