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Send book suggestions, something what would be a good match with our current reading list.
wiki.xxiivv.com/site/reading.h

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@neauoire Surely you're Joking Mr Feynman by Richard Feynman is a joy to read and re-read.

@neauoire “This Ugly Civilization” by Ralph Borsodi. You will be amazed at what he mapped out all the way back in 1929.

@neauoire Given all the Forth-related stuff on that list, you might enjoy Programming a Problem-Oriented Language by Chuck Moore. It explains why 1970s Forth turned out the way it did, and what alternative designs were considered and discarded. forth.org/POL.pdf (Please forgive me if I've recommended this one before. I evangelize it pretty heavily.)

@neauoire Some escapist non-collapse scifi:

Iain M. Banks: Culture Series

Peter F. Hamilton: Pandora's Star

@akkartik Permutation City was my first & only successful Egan. i adored the heck out of it. incredible book. i've failed upon some other Egans. i really need some Egan suggestions/encouragements.

@akkartik i've read almost everything else here, solid recommendations.

@dch @akkartik nice thanks. i've read Ballard's Kingdom Come & Drowned World & adored both. amazing, heady, high cincept but close at hand earths. really gotta get back to & read more Ballard.

@neauoire
I see both "Land of Lisp" and "Thinking Forth" in the list, so maybe "Let Over Lambda — 50 years of Lisp" by Doug Hoyte could interest you.

@neauoire Scar Night series from Alan Campbell. Mmm and China Miévilles’ Perdido St Station, The Scar, Iron Council en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bas-La the latter being my personal favourite but all three are outstanding works in their own right.

I often read Le Mur (JP Sartre) and Hermann Hesse’s The Glass Bead Game and Siddhartha which stand up to repeated reading. Kafka and Boll are always good too.

@neauoire
Staying with the Trouble, by Donna Haraway
Philosophy of Software Design, by John Ousterhout

@neauoire fwiw i've been cooompleeetely devoured by "The Traitor Baru Cormorant" as of late. very similar in themes to the (excellent!) Teixcalaan duology, in that it questions and explores colonialism & forms of power and empire

other interesting reads this year:
* If On A Winter's Night A Traveller by Italo Calvino
* Homage to Catalonia — Orwell (#1 book this year, so far)
* Children of Time — Adrian Tchaikovsky

@cblgh !! okay, well I am bumping Orwell's up my reading list then! I will look into the others 🙏

@neauoire oh yes definitely do that. it's such a rare book—a first-hand account of a pivotal historical moment *and* by an extremely talented and accomplished writer (& before they were accomplished!)

@cblgh After the suggestion by @sirvertalot, I've picked up Blindness, and wow. I think you might like it too, might want to keep a note of this one.

@neauoire Victor Papanek’s Design for the Real World is coming up on my own reading list soon and I’m excited for it. Looks like it might be of interest to you as well based on some of your other reading and lifestyle.

@neauoire posted this without tagging you before, sorry...

Richard Brautigan, "Trout Fishing in America"
John Varley, "The Persistence of Vision"
Tom Robbins, anything, but I prefer "Skinny Legs and All"

@khm I've read both Skinny Legs & All and trout fishing.

I thought The Persistence of Vision was something I had read but I haven't, I'll look it up :) thanks

@neauoire In that case I'll change my story:

Philip K. Dick, "Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said" and/or "A Scanner Darkly"

Niven & Pournelle, "The Mote in God's Eye"

@neauoire
Herman Hesse's Siddhartha
John William's Stoner

@neauoire
apologies if you've already hit any of these <3 --
*The Poetics of Space by Gaston Bachelard
*The Stars My Destination by Alfred Bester
*Something New Under the Sun by Alexandra Kleeman
*The Weather by Jenny Offill

@neauoire I described Swarm to a friend and they recommended Retrograde. And OMG it's short and perfect.

@akkartik ah yeah, I know of it!

I've just started José Saramago's Blindness and I can't put it down-

@neauoire I've been really enjoying _Tortilla Flat_ by John Steinbeck.

It's comic, sad, touching. And the sense of place is really powerful. Makes me want to live near the ocean somewhere sunny and eat beans and bread. And drink wine.
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Merveilles

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