And here's the final final track!
This is only the second track I've ever finished in my life, and the first that I've tried to properly produce.
Calling it "Departure" for now, let me know what you think :)

Holy shit. Someone named Isabel Fall took "I sexually identify as an attack helicopter" as a writing prompt and produced one of the most fabulous cyberpunk, post-human, trans-human mindfucks I've read in a long time. This is extremely my shit

clarkesworldmagazine.com/fall_

Haven't posted regular updates, but here's what I ended up with after day 9. This is the "final" version of the track, apart from mixing and mastering, which will happen next.

Result of day 3 and 4! Most of this was done yesterday, where I spent a good 3 hours trying to find a lead and bass sound. In the end, I went for a very unassuming bass, and just more piano :D Now I'm quite happy with the balance between the energetic drums and the melancholic piano part, and I think I've got a good direction I can keep to for the feel of this track. I believe that expanding on the song structure, adding a section B etc is next.

Day 2 (yesterday) was about adding more layers to the basic progression. The goal is to have rhythm, pads, bass and a lead in the end.
I only got percussion done so far because it took really long to find a sound and groove that I liked, but I think it was worth it. Continuing with the other parts today and tomorrow.

So I'm doing an online music production class (learnmonthly.com/andrew-huang-), and over the course of it you create 3 separate songs.
It started on Monday, so I've spent two evenings on it so far. Here's the result after day 1, which was about finding a sound and initial chord progression. I'm super happy with this piano sound, the multiband compressor that I applied by chance made it super crisp :)

Also, what digital task management systems can you recommend?
I think my needs are:
- organise tasks by project/topic
- schedule reminders about tasks in the future, ideally hide them until then
- allow making notes on tasks
- accessible via phone and desktop, synced between the two

Ultimately I want to build my own system, but I just don't have the time for that right now and need something to make a start at being more organised.

My current process of "open the thing on my phone browser and close it when I finally remember to read it" has just lead to a big pile of open tabs...

What "bookmarking workflow/service" can you recommend?
By that I mean, I want to save articles that I want to read later, grab one from the list when I have time, and occasionally reorganise / prune the list.
If everything that I read gets saved as well even better.

Time to buy all of William Gibson's books that I don't have yet. (Basically everything apart from sprawl, burning chrome and difference engine)

How William Gibson Keeps His Science Fiction Real

Pro-tip: not a New Yorker subscriber? Say 'fuck the paywall' and disable Javascript to read the full piece.

newyorker.com/magazine/2019/12

This article rang very true for me. Having finished university and thus not being on a clearly defined "track" anymore, the anxiety of choosing how to spend my life is the root cause for a lot of thought lately.

fun fact: chinese wheelbarrows are far more technologically advanced than european ones. like, you put them side by side & it looks like the europeans don't understand how levers work, it's embarrassing.

and there's a neat story about why!

solar.lowtechmagazine.com/2011

This is exactly the approach I always recommend to others when wanting to learn coding, because it has been how I have learned probably over half my knowledge of computers and programming.
Besides learning by doing and watching being possibly more effective, it's also much more motivating to have a goal to work towards, and to see progress.

I had never considered applying that principle more broadly to all learning, but I'll try to do so going forward.

"Start by Learning Concrete Things for a Specific Purpose:

- Learn to code by picking a particular piece of software or script you want to make.
- Learn a language by figuring out exactly where you want to use it (i.e. while traveling in Spain? Watching movies in Japanese? Reading literature in French?)
- Learn history by deciding to write an essay on the military strategies of ancient Rome, rather than by abstractly trying to learn a bunch of history."

"What Medieval People Got Right About Learning"

About the advantages of apprenticeships over the classroom approach, and how to use them to improve your own personal learning.

scotthyoung.com/blog/2019/06/0

Festive

600 LEDs on two strips
Each running on an Arduino, using Adafruit's NeoPixel library

Inspired by @neauoire, my progression of languages for personal projects:

Python -> C++ -> Haxe -> Rust

Not counting the various projects with language requirements (Java, Haskell etc for Uni) and games in engines with preferred languages (C#, Wren)

Wren, Rust, Python and C cover most of what I'm using atm, all of which I'm happy with.

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Merveilles

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